The Formation of the Uzbek Nation-State: A Study in Transition

By: Anita Sengupta

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CD2 - A hardcover book in very good condition that has some bumped corners, some scattered scratches and rubbing, light discoloration and shelf wear with no dust jacket. 9.25"x6.25", 335 pages. Satisfaction Guaranteed. Uzbekistan, officially Republic of Uzbekistan, is a country in Central Asia. It is bordered by five landlocked countries: Kazakhstan to the north; Kyrgyzstan to the northeast; Tajikistan to the southeast; Afghanistan to the south; and Turkmenistan to the southwest. Along with Liechtenstein, it is one of the world's only two doubly landlocked countries. As a sovereign state, Uzbekistan is a secular, unitary constitutional republic. It comprises 12 provinces and one autonomous republic. The capital and largest city of Uzbekistan is Tashkent. What is now Uzbekistan was in ancient times part of the Iranian-speaking region of Transoxiana and Turan. The first recorded settlers were Eastern Iranian nomads, known as Scythians, who founded kingdoms in Khwarezm (8th-6th centuries BC), Bactria (8th-6th centuries BC), Sogdia (8th-6th centuries BC), Fergana (3rd century BC - 6th century AD), and Margiana (3rd century BC - 6th century AD). The area was incorporated into the Iranian Achaemenid Empire and, after a period of Macedonian Greek rule, was ruled by the Iranian Parthian Empire and later by the Sasanian Empire, until the Arab conquest of Iran in the 7th century. The Muslim conquest in the 7th century converted the majority of the population, including the local ruling classes, into adherents of Islam. During this period, cities such as Samarkand, Khiva and Bukhara began to grow rich from the Silk Road. The local Khwarezmian dynasty, and Central Asia as a whole, were decimated by the Mongol invasion in the 13th century. After the Mongol Conquests, the area became increasingly dominated by Turkic peoples. The city of Shahrisabz was the birthplace of the Turco-Mongol warlord Timur, who in the 14th century established the Timurid Empire and was proclaimed the Supreme Emir of Turan with his capital in Samarkand. The area was conquered by Uzbek Shaybanids in the 16th century, moving the centre of power from Samarkand to Bukhara. The region was split into three states: Khanate of Khiva, Khanate of Kokand, and Emirate of Bukhara. It was gradually incorporated into the Russian Empire during the 19th century, with Tashkent becoming the political center of Russian Turkestan. In 1924, after national delimitation, the constituent republic of the Soviet Union known as the Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic was created. Following the break-up of the Soviet Union, it declared independence as the Republic of Uzbekistan on 31 August 1991. Uzbekistan has a diverse cultural heritage due to its storied history and strategic location. Its first major official language is Uzbek, a Turkic language written in the Latin alphabet and spoken natively by approximately 85% of the population. Russian has widespread use as an inter-ethnic communication language and as a language of governance. Uzbeks constitute 81% of the population, followed by Russians (5.4%), Tajiks (4.0%), Kazakhs (3.0%), and others (6.5%). Muslims constitute 79% of the population while 5% of the population follow Russian Orthodox Christianity, and 16% of the population follow other religions or are non-religious. A majority of Uzbeks are non-denominational Muslims.[13] Uzbekistan is a member of the CIS, OSCE, UN, and the SCO. While officially a democratic republic, by 2008 non-governmental human rights organisations defined Uzbekistan as "an authoritarian state with limited civil rights".

Title: The Formation of the Uzbek Nation-State: A Study in Transition

Author: Anita Sengupta

Categories: History, Politics & Government,

Publisher: Lanham, Maryland, Lexington Books: 2003

ISBN: 073910618X

ISBN 13: 9780739106181

Binding: Hard Cover

Book Condition: Very Good

Jacket Condition: No Jacket

Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall

Book ID: ec52867

Keywords: HISTORY UZBEKISTAN 1917-1991 NATIONALISM 20TH CENTURY ASIAN STUDIES POLITICAL SCIENCE,